Homework

New Mills School is committed to setting students homework that will allow them to make the most use of their time in lessons and make the best possible educational progress.

Throughout Years 7-11, students’ homework assignments are not set in line with a rigid homework timetable as much educational research indicates that this leads to tasks being set to meet the needs of the rota rather than the needs of the student. Therefore, teachers will set homework when it is most relevant and effective in advancing your child’s learning. Teachers will aim to set homework once a week, unless at a particular point in the curriculum where they might set more, or occasionally less. The guideline to teachers is not to set work with next day deadlines to avoid creating bottlenecks for students. However, if a homework task is short (10 minutes), it may be given with an overnight deadline. Obviously the type and amount of homework set will vary depending on the point your child has reached in their school career.

Students should write their homework assignments in their planner and clearly record the day it is due to be handed in. Carers are then able to support their children in managing their workload and meeting deadlines.

If a student fails to complete a homework set, their teacher will record that on the school system and add a note in the relevant section of their planner. In this situation students will be provided an opportunity to catch up on their homework. Students who repeatedly neglect their homework will be followed up in line with the school’s homework policy.

If a student misses a homework because of absence, it is their own responsibility to catch up with not only class work, but the homework set.

Should there be concerns about the amount of work set, either too much or too little,  carers can raise their worries by contacting the student’s form tutor by writing a note in the planner.

Homework can take many forms. It might be a research homework that supports work to be done in the future or a consolidation task that allows students to apply the knowledge they have recently learnt at school. Homework might be a thinking or reasoning task, a written task, a reading task or a revision/learning task. In some subjects homework might be part of a longer term project which is spread over a half-term or longer.

In sixth form, homework is not set to a rigid timetable as more mature students are expected to have developed their independent time-management skills. Students should expect to be set approximately 4 hours independent work per week per subject. They have opportunities to complete this in their study periods in school as well as at home. As with the homework programme lower down the school, assignments may take many forms from a written exam practice question to preparing a paired presentation.