Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium Funding was introduced by the Government in 2011 to address the disadvantage evident in the outcomes of young people entitled to Free School Meals (FSM), who are Looked After (LAC) or whose parents are in the Forces (Forces children).

The 2016-17 Overview Plan for Pupil Premium at NMS is available here.

2015-16 Pupil Premium Review

The funding for New Mills School last year amounted to £106,620, an increase of almost £10,000 on the previous year. We were therefore able to extend, develop and strengthen many of the successful measures we had put in place the year before and target effective support more appropriately.

The Pupil Premium funding has been used to provide support to, and resources for eligible students in the following ways:

  • 1 to 1 tuition
  • Small group support
  • In-class support
  • Emotional support (counselling, positive support)
  • Transition support
  • Mentoring
  • Careers/future planning support
  • Attendance monitoring
  • Revision programmes and guides
  • Staff training
  • Accelerated Reader programme
  • Music lessons
  • ICT support
  • Funding for trips and visits
  • Uniform purchase

Impact

There were some fantastic individual achievements from the Y11 students eligible for Pupil Premium in their GCSE results, three of whom achieved a Progress 8 score of above +1. This means they achieved over a grade more than national expectations from their starting points across all subjects. A further four students eligible for Pupil Premium achieved at least half a grade higher than nationally expected.

When looked at as a group the outcomes for our Y11 students who were eligible for the Pupil Premium, compared with those that weren’t were:

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Overall, last year’s Y11 Pupil Premium eligible students did not attain or progress as well as their non-eligible peers. An in depth scrutiny of the reasons behind this has been carried out. The major reasons behind the decline in outcomes are the academic profile of the eligible cohort and the options taken by eligible students.

More of the students in the eligible group were of lower prior attainment, meaning achieving C grades in English and Maths, and high Attainment 8 scores was always a challenge. The options that the eligible students made meant their courses did not fulfil the requirements of the progress 8 and attainment 8 ‘baskets’. This made achieving positive progress very difficult for them as their scores are averaged over 8 subjects when some only had 6 or 7 qualifying courses.

Having scrutinised the in school differences for our eligible and non-eligible students, we then look at comparing New Mills School with other schools. The progress 8 score for the students who were eligible for the Pupil Premium is below national average for all students at -0.37, but New Mills School ranks fourth nationally for progress, when compared with similar schools with a similar proportion of eligible students.

As a school we are striving for our eligible students to progress and attain as well as their non-eligible peers. Due to the outcomes last year, the progress and attainment of the students eligible for Pupil Premium is a major whole school focus this year.   

Looking at our cohort as a whole in this way, however, does mask some important variations within this group of students. There is evidence that the work done with students eligible for Pupil Premium had a positive impact, both on individuals and on groups within the group. One example of this is with the more able students Y11 who were eligible for the Pupil Premium. They narrowed the gaps on their non-eligible peers in both attainment and progress 8.
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3In maths, 55% of the eligible students who received HLTA intervention met or exceeded their aspirational targets. 73% improved or maintained their mock result. In English, all students who received HLTA intervention to support their controlled assessment made expected progress overall, with 65% making better than expected progress. In science, students eligible for the Pupil Premium received small group tuition from a HLTA. 79% of eligible students who received this intervention made 3 or 4 levels progress in their final GSCSE, compared to 34% of these after their mock exams. 79% of students in this intervention improved or maintained their mock results.

The uptake of EBacc has increased from last year with 57% of the more able PP students in Y9 choosing it. Those more able PP students that did not opt for full EBacc have choses Computer Science rather than a language. This bodes well for future EBacc measures.

A full review of all actions taken with their impacts is available here.

2016-17 Pupil Premium Plans

Our core purpose is to ensure that students of all abilities and backgrounds have high aspirations and achieve their potential. By continuing our relentless drive to maintain and improve the quality of teaching and learning we expect to further improve the outcomes of all the students at New Mills this will be demonstrated through our headline figures. We aim to identify skills gaps, and address them, as early as possible. Therefore, during the 2016 – 2017 academic year we will increase, even more, our provision and interventions (when needed) in all year groups. However, following a review of our 2015-16 plans, we have also identified the following strategic aims for the pupil premium cohort:

A.    Being ready to learn
B.    Engaging with school (students and families)
C.    Learning and achieving

Being ready to learn is focussed on making sure students attend school, on time.

Engaging with school is ensuring that when the students are in school they make the most out of the opportunities afforded to them.  This aim involves supporting students to behave well, have good attitudes to learning, and participate in extra-curricular activities. It also involves working with families to make sure the child’s education is supported at home.

Learning and achieving focusses on the outcomes of a student’s time at New Mills School. It looks at ways to maximise progress and attainment as well as the future education and careers of our students

The detailed pupil premium plan is based on these three strategic aims. A copy of the detailed plan is available to download here

The impact of each strategic aim of this work will be ascertained through the following measures comparing students eligible for the Pupil Premium with those who are not eligible:

1)       Being ready to learn

  • The percentage attendance for NMS disadvantaged students to be better than national disadvantaged, aiming towards the percentage for all pupils nationally
  • The percentage of NMS disadvantaged students who are persistently absent to be lower than national disadvantaged, aiming towards the percentage for all pupils nationally
  • The percentage of NMS disadvantaged students who are late to be lower than national average
  • The proportion of NMS disadvantaged students with fixed term exclusions to be lower than national disadvantaged, aiming towards the percentage for all pupils nationally

2)       Engaging with school (students and families)

  • The proportion of C3 and C4 incidents from eligible students and non- eligible students to be in line with cohort proportions
  • A difference of less than 10% between eligible students and non- eligible students in the percentage of the parents attending parents evenings
  •  A difference of less than 10% between eligible students and non- eligible students in the percentage of the students attending extra-curricular provision
  • No significant differences in 3R’s scores* or work scrutiny
  •  Positive pupil voice

3)       Learning and achieving: For disadvantaged pupils as a cohort, and when analysed for gender and ability differences there is:

  • Less than 5% difference in the percentage of students achieving or exceeding expected targets
  • Attainment 8 scores in line with targets for the cohort
  • A difference of less than 10% between eligible students and non- eligible students on the basics measure
  • A difference of less than 10% between eligible students and non- eligible students on the EBacc measure
  • All D students continue to appropriate further education and training

(*) Notes:

Significance: Significance tests will be performed on the data using a 95% confidence interval. The New Mills disadvantaged cohort’s values will be tested against the New Mills non-disadvantaged cohort’s for each measure.

A measure is not statistically significantly different from average if its 95% confidence interval contains the average. If the measure’s confidence interval is completely above the average, then we say it is "statistically significantly above average", denoted by "sig+". Alternatively, if the measure’s confidence interval is completely below the average, then we say it is "statistically significantly below average", denoted by "sig-"

EBacc: This target is calculated as a percentage of those students who actually took the EBacc and not of the whole cohort.


The impact measures with historical data can be found here.